INTERVIEW WITH BRICKS MAGAZINE 2018
https://www.bricksmagazine.co.uk 

Where are you from? 

Cardiff, South Wales. But I’ve lived in London for quite a few years now.

 

What do you do? 

Director, I also write

 

 What are your hopes and dreams for the future?

A socialist uprising, but Britain doesn’t have a history of revolution in that way, we are quite docile as a country.​
 

3. What social-political issues do you discuss in your new film or wish people would discuss/ cover more?

The NHS, always. I wish that the news etc would present the public with a more accurate portrayal of what is really happening. People need to be aware of what’s going on.
It’s not just in decline, it’s not going to be able to recover; Massively because of the ageing population, it’s not equipped to deal with that but the tori cuts will be it’s ultimate downfall.

There’s a saying that comes from within the NHS which is that ‘there’s no money in the NHS, and every year there is less no money.’
That isn’t conspiracy, the tories want it to be privatised, they don’t need it. I’ve been working on a film (which i’m struggling to get funding for) with these pharmacists surrounding co-morbidities, and the NHS and I asked one of the profesionals (who I won’t name) directly, what future they saw for the NHS, to which they replied. “I mean I hope that the NHS is still around in 10 years time, I’m not sure that it will be, at least not as we know it now. I think it will be something akin to the Australian system where you pay to see your GP, pay a fixed fee for all medication with no exemptions for anyone.”

I feel like there is a general belief that the NHS is this foundation of post war Great Britain, that we the people and our government will never really allow it to be dismantled but this privatisation is happening, and it’s rapid. For now it’s tube posters for private hospitals with slogans like ‘no waiting times, no queues just expert care’. I mean the HCA UK, which stands for Hospital Corporation of America is a registered charity here in the UK now, meaning that private hospitals get tax breaks. This information should be common knowledge.

People are literally dying because they can’t get treatment in time. The tory government’s handle on the NHS is actually murder.

5. What are you hoping will be achieved in 2019?

Politically speaking? It’s a difficult question because I actually firmly believe that we are in Maggie time all over again and so that we are stuck under Tory reign for the next 5 years at least. Then things will get so bad that a ‘New New Labour’ is formed, i’m just hoping that is more Old Labour than Blair’s New Labour. Neu Bevan (welshman and founder of the NHS) said when Labour lost back in 1959, ‘are we as the mother and father of socialism going to change our policies in response to a temporary unpopularity in a temporary affluent society.’ That’s what I mean by old labour.

6. What do you want to convey to the rest of the world?

I want to convey narratives, stories, that’s how I see my work. This notion of social consciousness is really topical in 2018, I recently directed a short for BBC2 and I kept having awful conversations about message pushing, I feel

like political correctness has taken a dark turn where business people are

socialism going to change our policies in response to a temporary

unpopularity in a temporary affluent society.’ That’s what I mean by old labour.

6. What do you want to convey to the rest of the world?

I want to convey narratives, stories, that’s how I see my work. This notion of social consciousness is really topical in 2018, I recently directed a short for BBC2 and I kept having awful conversations about message pushing, I feel like political correctness has taken a dark turn where business people are commodifying certain issues in order to stay relevant, so I see often now, short films are like these campaign videos they aren’t cinema. I watched The Way We Were last night, this is like a big American Romantic Drama from the 70s, it’s a love story about two people and their politics is implicit in their character and in the story, Babs Streisand is a ‘politically active jew’ and Robert Redford is a ‘feckless WASP’, the film profusely references the political climate and it’s a blockbuster romance too.

Cinema is or should be an experience it should make you feel something and when you feel something you care, i’m not sure it works or I have the capacity to just say something, I think films are a way to convey something.

8. Why is it so important to have a voice?

There’s a really good bit of dialogue in Inside daisy clover, where Christopher Plummer is making Natalie Wood a ‘star’, it’s like an old hollywood story about how badly these starlets were treated, it’s like a psychological thriller, it’s amazing and in the script, he asks her why she sings and she says (In like thick new york accent):

My mother says this world's a garbage dump. And we're just the flies it attracts. Maybe she's right. But when I sing, the smell doesn't seem so bad.

So yeah , there’s a lot of snobbery, (in the left as well) surrounding supposed political activism, it’s easy to understand that the atmosphere of capitol breeds apathy but It is important to have an opinion at least, I’m writing this film at the moment and one of the main characters is this kind of anarchic-commie guy, loosely based on Jeff Monson who’s this American born pro Russia UFC fighter, he’s massively passionate about Anarchism and he said in an interview where he was asked about his anarchic activism, something like ‘you’ve got to be able to face yourself in the mirror every morning’.

9. What do you use your voice for?

Same as above really, or I try and stick to that mantra, the Inside Daisy Clover one. If you are watching a really good story and you care about the characters, you’ll begin to understand their politics, or at least have empathy for them and the first step to changing something is to try and make someone understand something.